Determining Your Company’s Undocumented Value

Business appraisals are not one-dimensional.  In fact, a good business appraisal is one that factors in a wide range of variables in order to achieve an accurate result.  Indisputable records ranging from comparables and projections to EBITDA multiples, discount rates and a good deal more are all factored in.

It is important to remember that while an appraiser may feel that he or she has all the information necessary, it is still possible they have overlooked key information.  Business appraisers must understand the purpose of their appraisal before beginning the process.  All too often appraisers are unaware of important additional factors and considerations that could enhance or even devalue a business’s worth.

There Can Be Unwritten Value

Value isn’t always “black and white.”  Instead, many factors can determine value.  Prospective buyers may be looking at variables, such as profitability, depth of management and market share, but there can be more that determines value.

Here are some of the factors to consider when determining value: How much market competition is there?  Does the business have potential beyond its current niche?  Are there a variety of vendors?  Does the company have easy access to its target audience?  At the end of the day, what is the company’s competitive advantage?  Is pricing in line with the demographic served?  These are just some of the key questions that you’ll want to consider when evaluating a company.

There are Ways to Increase Both Valuation and Success

No doubt, successful businesses didn’t get that way by accident.  A successful business is one that is customer focused and has company-wide values.  Brian Tracy’s excellent book, “The 100 Absolutely Unbreakable Laws of Business,” notes that it is critical for businesses to have a company-wide focus on three key pillars: marketing, sales and, of course, revenue generation.  Tracy also points out that trends can be seen as the single most vital factor and bottom-line contributor to any company’s success and, ultimately, valuation.  For 2018 and beyond, projected trends include an increase in video marketing, the use of crowdfunding as a means of product validation and more.

No Replacement for Understanding Trends

If a company doesn’t understand trends, then it can’t understand both the market as it stands and as it may be tomorrow.  Savvy business owners understand today’s trends and strive to capitalize on the mistakes of their competitors while simultaneously learning from their competitors’ successes.

Tracy accurately states that while there are many variables in determining value, finding and retaining the best people is absolutely essential.  One of the greatest assets that any company has is, in the end, its people.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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Considering All of Your Business Real Estate Options

In a recent December 2018 article in Divestopedia entitled, “Options for Business Real Estate When Selling a Company,” the topic of business real estate was explored at length.

One of the key points of the article was that understanding one’s business real estate options would ultimately help in achieving “the goals desired in a transaction.”  The article is correct to point out that many, or even arguably most, business owners simply don’t know what real estate options are available to them when it comes time to sell the company.

In particular, there are two big options:

  1. Sell everything including the real estate.
  2. Hold onto the real estate for the rental income.

In the Divestopedia article, the authors correctly point out that if you, as the business owner, personally own the real estate in a separate entity, then you are good to go.  You should have a “clear path to valuation.”

However, if your company owns the real estate, then things get a little more complicated.  If this is the situation you’ll want to have a third-party appraisal of the real estate so that its value is clear.  The article also points out that if your business is a C-Corp and your business also owns the real estate, then it’s a good idea to talk to your accountant as there will be differences in taxation.

Every situation is different.  Many buyers will prefer to acquire the real estate along with the business.  On the other hand, many buyers may prefer a lease, as they don’t want everything that comes along with owning real estate.  Communicating with the buyer regarding his or her preference is a savvy move.

Now, as Divestopedia points out, if you do plan to retain the building, then you’ll want to be certain that a strong lease is in place.  Ask any business broker about the importance of having a strong lease, and you’ll get some pretty clear-cut feedback.  Namely, you always want to have a strong lease.

Issues such as who repairs what and why should all be spelled out in the lease.  It should leave nothing to chance.  One of the best points made in the Divestopedia article is that you will want a strong lease for another key reason.  When the time comes to sell the property, you want to show you have a lease that is generating good income.

Real estate and the sale of your business are not one-dimensional topics.  There are many variables that go into selling when real estate is involved.  It is important to consider all of the variables and work with a business broker who can help guide you through this potentially complex topic.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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Four Significant Issues You Need to Consider When Selling Your Business

The process of selling a business can be very complex. Whether you’ve sold a business in the past or are selling a business for the very first time, it is imperative that you work with an expert. A seasoned business broker can help you navigate through what can be some pretty rough waters. Let’s take a closer look at four issues any seller needs to keep in mind why selling a business.

Number One – Overreaching

If you are both simultaneously the founder, owner and operator of a business, then there is a good chance that you are involved in every single decision. And that can be a significant mistake. Business owners typically want to be involved in every aspect of selling their business, but handling the sale of your business while operating can lead to problems or even disaster.

The bottom line is that you can’t handle it all. You’ll need to delegate the day-to-day operation of your business to a sales manager. Additionally, you’ll want to consider bringing on an experienced business broker to assist with the sale of your business. Simultaneously, running a business and trying to sell has gone awry for even the most seasoned multitaskers.

Number Two – Money Related Issues

It is quite common that once a seller has decided on a price, he or she has trouble settling for anything less. The emotional ties that business owners have to their businesses are understandable, but they can also be irrational and serve as an impediment to a sale. A business broker is an essential intermediary that can keep deals on track and emotions at a minimum.

Number Three – Time

When you are selling a business, the last thing you want is to waste time. Working with a business broker ensures that you avoid “window shoppers” and instead only deal with real, vetted prospects who are serious about buying. Your time is precious, and most sellers are unaware of just how much time selling a business can entail.

Number Four – Don’t Forget the Stockholders

Stockholders simply must be included in the process whatever their shares may be. A business owner needs to obtain the approval of stock holders. Two of the best ways to achieve this is to get an attractive sales price and secondly, to achieve the best terms possible. Once again, a business broker serves as an invaluable ally in both regards.

Selling a business isn’t just complicated; it can also be stressful, confusing and overwhelming. This is especially true if you have never sold a business before. Business brokers “know the ropes” and they know what it takes to both get a deal on the table and then push that deal to the finish line.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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What Sellers Don’t Expect When Selling Their Companies

In the proverbial “perfect world,” business owners would plan three to five years ahead to sell their companies.  But, as one industry expert has suggested, business owners very seldom plan to sell; rather, selling is “event driven.”  Partner disputes, divorce, burn-out, health, and new competition are examples of events that can force the sale of a business.

Sellers often find, after they have decided to sell, that the unexpected happens and they are “blindsided” and caught off-guard.  Here are a few of the unexpected events that can occur.

The Substantial Time Commitment

Sellers find that the time necessary to comply with the requests of not only the intermediary, but also the potential buyers can take valuable time away from the actual running of the business.  The information necessary to compile the offering memorandum takes time to collect.  Many sellers are unaware of the amount of their time necessary to gather all the documents and information required for the offering memorandum, nor of its importance to the selling process.

There is also the time necessary to meet and visit with prospective buyers.  An intermediary will play an important role in screening prospects and separating the “prospects from the suspects.”

Handling the Confidentiality Issue

Owners of many companies are also the founders and creators of them.  They can have difficulty in delegating and tend to want to make all of the decisions themselves.  When it comes time to sell, they want to be involved in everything, thus, again, taking time away from running the business.  Members of the management team, like the sales manager, have a lot of the information necessary not only for the memorandum, but also on competitive issues, possible acquirers, etc.  The owner has to allow his or her managers to be part of the selling process.  This is easier said than done.

Forgetting the Others

Many mid-sized, privately held companies also have minority stockholders or family members who have an interest in the business.  The managing owner may be the majority stockholder; but in today’s business world, minority stockholders have strong rights.  The owner has to deal with these people, first in getting an agreement to sell, then convincing them about the price and terms.  A “fairness opinion” can help resolve some of the pricing issues.  Minority stockholders and family interests have to be dealt with and not overlooked or pushed to the end of the deal.  When this happens, many times it is the end of the deal, literally speaking.

The Price is the Price is the Price

All sellers have a price in mind when it comes time to sell their companies. Most businesses go to market with a fairly aggressive price structure.  When an offer(s) is presented, it is generally, sometimes significantly, lower than the seller anticipated.  They are never prepared for this event – they are blindsided, and obviously not very happy.  They turn the deal down without even looking past the price.  Here is where an intermediary comes in, by helping structure the deal so it can work for both sides.

Not Having Their Own Way

Business owners are used to calling the shots.  When an offer is presented, they, in some cases, think that they can call all of the shots.  They have to understand that selling their company is a “give and take.”  They can stand firm on the issues most important to them, but they have to give on others.  Also, some owners want their attorneys to make all of the decisions, both legal and business.  Unfortunately, some attorneys usurp this decision.  Owners must make the business decisions.

Confidentiality Leaked

There is always the small possibility that the word will leak out that the business is for sale.  It may just be a rumor that gets started or it may be worse – the confidentiality is exposed.  Sellers must have a contingency plan in case this happens.  A simple explanation that growth capital is being considered or expansion is being explored may quell the rumor.

“Keeping Your Eye on the Ball”

With all that is involved in marketing a business for sale, the owner must still run the business – now, more than ever.  Buyers will be kept up-to-date on the progress of the business, despite the fact that it is for sale.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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The Importance of Understanding Leases

Leases should never be overlooked when it comes to buying or selling a business.  After all, where your business is located and how long you can stay at that location plays a key role in the overall health of your business.  It is easy to get lost with “larger” issues when buying or selling a business.  But in terms of stability, few factors rank as high as that of a lease.  Let’s explore some of the key facts you’ll want to keep in mind where leases are concerned.

The Different Kinds of Leases

In general, there are three different kinds of leases: sub-lease, new lease and the assignment of the lease.  These leases clearly differ from one another, and each will impact a business in different ways.

A sub-lease is a lease within a lease.  If you have a sub-lease then another party holds the original lease.  It is very important to remember that in this situation the seller is the landlord.  In general, sub-leasing will require that permission is granted by the original landlord.  With a new lease, a lease has expired and the buyer must obtain a new lease from the landlord.  Buyers will want to be certain that they have a lease in place before buying a new business otherwise they may have to relocate the business if the landlord refuses to offer a new lease.

The third lease option is the assignment of lease.  Assignment of lease is the most common type of lease when it comes to selling a business.  Under the assignment of lease, the buyer is granted the use of the location where the business is currently operating.  In short, the seller assigns to the buyer the rights of the lease.  It is important to note that the seller does not act as the landlord in this situation.

Understand All Lease Issues to Avoid Surprises

Early on in the buying process, buyers should work to understand all aspects of a business’s lease.  No one wants an unwelcomed surprise when buying a business, for example, discovering that a business must be relocated due to lease issues.

Summed up, don’t ignore the critical importance of a business’s leasing situation.  Whether you are buying or selling a business, it is in your best interest to clearly understand your lease situation.  Buyers want stable leases with clearly defined rules and so do sellers, as sellers can use a stable leasing agreement as a strong sales tool.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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The Deal Is Almost Done — Or Is It?

The Letter of Intent has been signed by both buyer and seller and everything seems to be moving along just fine. It would seem that the deal is almost done. However, the due diligence process must now be completed. Due diligence is the process in which the buyer really decides to go forward with the deal, or, depending on what is discovered, to renegotiate the price – or even to withdraw from the deal. So, the deal may seem to be almost done, but it really isn’t – yet!

It is important that both sides to the transaction understand just what is going to take place in the due diligence process. The importance of the due diligence process cannot be underestimated. Stanley Foster Reed in his book, The Art of M&A, wrote, “The basic function of due diligence is to assess the benefits and liabilities of a proposed acquisition by inquiring into all relevant aspects of the past, present, and predictable future of the business to be purchased.”

Prior to the due diligence process, buyers should assemble their experts to assist in this phase. These might include appraisers, accountants, lawyers, environmental experts, marketing personnel, etc. Many buyers fail to add an operational person familiar with the type of business under consideration. The legal and accounting side may be fine, but a good fix on the operations themselves is very important as a part of the due diligence process. After all, this is what the buyer is really buying.

Since the due diligence phase does involve both buyer and seller, here is a brief checklist of some of the main items for both parties to consider.

Industry Structure

Figure the percentage of sales by product line, review pricing policies, consider discount structure and product warranties; and if possible check against industry guidelines.

Human Resources

Review names, positions and responsibilities of the key management staff. Also, check the relationships, if appropriate, with labor, employee turnover, and incentive and bonus arrangements.

Marketing

Get a list of the major customers and arrive at a sales breakdown by region, and country, if exporting. Compare the company’s market share to the competition, if possible.

Operations

Review the current financial statements and compare to the budget. Check the incoming sales, analyze the backlog and the prospects for future sales.

Balance Sheet

Accounts receivables should be checked for aging, who’s paying and who isn’t, bad debt and the reserves. Inventory should be checked for work-in-process, finished goods along with turnover, non-usable inventory and the policy for returns and/or write-offs.

Environmental Issues

This is a new but quite complicated process. Ground contamination, ground water, lead paint and asbestos issues are all reasons for deals not closing, or at best not closing in a timely manner.

Manufacturing

This is where an operational expert can be invaluable. Does the facility work efficiently? How old and serviceable is the machinery and equipment? Is the technology still current? What is it really worth? Other areas, such as the manufacturing time by product, outsourcing in place, key suppliers – all of these should be checked.

Trademarks, Patents & Copyrights

Are these intangible assets transferable, and whose name are they in. If they are in an individual name – can they be transferred to the buyer? In today’s business world where intangible assets may be the backbone of the company, the deal is generally based on the satisfactory transfer of these assets.

Due diligence can determine whether the buyer goes through with the deal or begins a new round of negotiations. By completing the due diligence process, the buyer process insures, as far as possible, that the buyer is getting what he or she bargained for. The executed Letter of Intent is, in many ways, just the beginning.

Buying a Business – Some Key Consideration

  • What’s for sale? What’s not for sale? Is real estate included? Is some of the machinery and/or equipment leased?
  • Is there anything proprietary such as patents, copyrights or trademarks?
  • Are there any barriers of entry? Is it capital, labor, intellectual property, personal relationships, location – or what?
  • What is the company’s competitive advantage – special niche, great marketing, state-of-the-art manufacturing capability, well-known brands, etc.?
  • Are there any assets not generating income and can they be sold?
  • Are agreements in place with key employees and if not – why not?
  • How can the business grow?  Or, can it grow?
  • Is the business dependent on the owner? Is there any depth to the management team?
  • How is the financial reporting handled? Is it sufficient for the business? How does management utilize it?

Selling Your Business? Expect the Unexpected!

According to the experts, a business owner should lay the groundwork for selling at about the same time as he or she first opens the door for business.  Great advice, but it rarely happens.  Most sales of businesses are event-driven; i.e., an event or circumstance such as partnership problems, divorce, health, or just plain burn-out pushes the business owner into selling.  The business owner now becomes a seller without considering the unexpected issues that almost always occur.  Here are some questions that need answering before selling:

How much is your time worth?
Business owners have a business to run, and they are generally the mainstay of the operation.  If they are too busy trying to meet with prospective buyers, answering their questions and getting necessary data to them, the business may play second fiddle.  Buyers can be very demanding and ignoring them may not only kill a possible sale, but will also reduce the purchase price.  Using the services of a business broker is a great time saver. In addition to all of the other duties they will handle, they will make sure that the owners meet only with qualified prospects and at a time convenient for the owner.

How involved do you need to be?
Some business owners feel that they need to know every detail of a buyer’s visit to the business. They want to be involved in this, and in every other detail of the process.  This takes away from running the business.  Owners must realize that prospective buyers assume that the business will continue to run successfully during the sales process and through the closing.  Micromanaging the sales process takes time from the business.  This is another reason to use the services of a business broker.  They can handle the details of the selling process, and they will keep sellers informed every step of the way – leaving the owner with the time necessary to run the business.  However, they are well aware that it is the seller’s business and that the seller makes the decisions.

Are there any other decision makers?
Sellers sometimes forget that they have a silent partner, or that they put their spouse’s name on the liquor license, or that they sold some stock to their brother-in-law in exchange for some operating capital.  These part-owners might very well come out of the woodwork and create issues that can thwart a sale.  A silent partner ceases to be silent and expects a much bigger slice of the pie than the seller is willing to give.  The answer is for the seller to gather approvals of all the parties in writing prior to going to market.

How important is confidentiality?

This is always an important issue.  Leaks can occur.  The more active the selling process (which benefits the seller and greatly increases the chance of a higher price), the more likely the word will get out.  Sellers should have a back-up plan in case confidentiality is breached.  Business brokers are experienced in maintaining confidentiality and can be a big help in this area.

Selling a Business: How Long Does It Take?

A recent survey revealed that the average time between listing and sale was 9 months.

Why does it take so long to sell a business?  Price and terms are the biggest reasons.  Not over-pricing the business at the beginning of the sales process is a big plus, as well as structuring the transaction to include a reasonable down payment with the seller carrying the balance. Having all of the necessary information right from the beginning can also greatly reduce the time period from listing to closing. 

Being prepared for the information a buyer may want to review or having the answers available for the questions a buyer may want answered is also key.

Here is the basic information that a prospective acquirer will want to review:

  • Copies of the financials for the past three years.
  • A copy of the lease and any assignments of the lease from previous sales.
  • A list of the fixtures and equipment that will be included in the sale. Note: If something is not included, it is best to remove it prior to the sale or at least have a list of items not included.
  • A copy of the franchise agreement if applicable or any agreements with suppliers or vendors.
  • Copies of any other documentation pertaining to the business.
  • Supporting documents for patents, copyrights, trademarks, etc.
  • Sales brochures, press releases, advertisements, menus or other sales materials.

In addition, here are some of the questions that buyers may have.  A prepared seller should have ready answers as well as the information to support them.

  • Is the seller willing to train a new owner at no charge?
  • Are there any zoning or local restrictions that would impact the business?
  • Is there any pending litigation?
  • Are any license issues involved?
  • Are there any federal or state requirements, or environmental OSHA issues that could affect the business?
  • What about the employee situation? Are there key employees?
  • Are there any copyrights, secret recipes, mailing lists, etc?
  • What about major suppliers or vendors?

A prepared seller is a willing seller, and having the answers to the above questions can significantly reduce the time it takes to sell a business.  Using the services of a professional business broker can also greatly reduce the time period.  They are knowledgeable about the current market, how to market a business and how to best advise a seller on price and terms.  They can also recommend professional advisors, if a seller doesn’t have them already.  Using advisors who are transaction-experienced can also shorten the time it takes to close the sale.